The Necessary Evil of Keeping Up with the Kardashians as a Social Media Marketer

Kardashian. One word that can invoke polar opposite reactions from anyone who has ever heard of at least one of the members of this famous family.

* Photo from Page Six

* Photo from Page Six

Kim, Kylie, Kendall, Khloe, Kourtney and Kris are just some of the members of the Kardashian “klub” (because it’s all k’s with these folks).

I love celebrity gossip. I’ll admit it. I have always been an avid consumer of film and television and it’s just one of those things I like to keep up on.

The Kardashians, not so much.

Not long after the show premiered, I was fan. I enjoyed it for about a year or so before each of their careers really took off. Since then, I find myself not as interested.

So why do I feel this overwhelming urge to still keep up with the Kardashians? Simple. I’m a social media marketer.

Whether you love them or hate them, these ladies know (or least their people know) how to use social media not just effectively but well. Really well.

Let’s take a look at just the Facebook, Twitter and Instagram following of Kim Kardashian-West, Kourtney Kardashian, Khloe Kardashian, Kendall Jenner and Kylie Jenner.

 Name Facebook Twitter Instagram  Total Network
Kim Kardashian-West 26,533, 280 36,600,000 50,200,000 86,800,000
Kylie Jenner 8,707,150 12,000,000 40,500,000 61,207,150
Kendall Jenner 9,691,071 13,100,000 39,600,000 62,391,071
Khloe Kardashian 14,737,309 16,700,000 34,600,000 66,037,309
Kourtney Kardashian 12,555,676 16,400,000 27,500,000 56,455,676
 * As of 10/26/15 Total 332,891,206

In other words, these ladies can reach a lot of people separately but even more combined – and on a global scale. It’s no wonder that so many brands want to work with them.

From fashion lines to nail polish to mobile apps, they have their names adorning so many different categories of products, it’s enough to make your head spin – and that’s just their products. Additionally, major brands spend millions on for just a few social media posts of them enjoying a given product.

They’re usually some of the first celebrities to be given access to beta features for Twitter and Instagram because their following could provide a given social platform a great test to see whether or not their new feature would be great for the general consumer or at least celebrities and brands depending on the feature.

Their strategy folks are some of the best in the business because it seems they are always intriguing to their adoring fans and they have taken their personas from their various television shows to 24-hour, year-round access to these women.

So to keep up with the biggest emerging social media features and trends, the ladies Kardashian can be some of the best folks to follow.

** Featured image from Page Six

Same Stage, Different Platform

I have a confession. In junior high and high school, I was a HUGE theater nerd. I was one of those kids from “Glee” before it was cool. It was not uncommon for my friends and I to sing Broadway tunes down the halls on the way to class, or opt to improvise a scene about a subject in class rather than pulling together a poster board. In a nutshell, I was consumed by theater.

From a curtain call dress rehearsal of “42nd Street” from my junior year of high school. I’m on the left.

I performed in plays, musicals, and improv troupes. I also was dedicated to choir and even won a few medals from ensemble competitions.

So here I am now as a social media marketer. A month or so ago, I found myself looking for inspiration while working on a client’s posts for the next month. I kept thinking about the customers who typically would go to the restaurant. I thought about what they sounded like, what they looked like, and how the spoke. I thought further and thought what would they expect a person who manages the Facebook/Twitter/Foursquare of the location to sound like. Then it hit me.

I needed to change the way I was writing by creating a “character” for the restaurant.

When I was cast in a play in the past, a common exercise would be to develop the character’s story from inside and out. Everything from how old the character was, to where they were from, and even down to what food they liked. This would all help build the character for the performer. So I did the same for the restaurant’s character.

And it worked! It helped the words flow with a quirky edge that this restaurant fits. Since writing in this way, the page’s interaction has gone up on Facebook in particular, and more customers are commenting.

I guess it goes to show you, you can take the girl out of the theater, but you can’t take the theater out of the girl.

#NASCAR

I began my public relations career working primarily with a variety of internships. In a number of these positions, I worked with NASCAR brands and racetracks.

Having worked around motorsports for about four years, it was interesting to watch the sport change as the popularity of social media grew. I can remember in 2008 when Twitter really started to take off with many brands, journalists and drivers trying to utilize this new way of engaging race fans.

Now, four years later, NASCAR has become dominated by social media, especially Twitter. One of the best examples of this was when Brad Keselowski garnered over 100,000 new followers on Twitter while the Daytona 500 was under red flag conditions.

With that single event, NASCAR was forever changed showing other sports that NASCAR was not stuffy and behind-the-times. NASCAR was on the brink of something big.

Last weekend was the racing world was forever changed with the Pocono 400 presented by #NASCAR. This was the first time in the history of sports in which a major sporting event incorporated their title with a hashtag into an event. Furthermore, they set up a special Twitter page which aggregates all #NASCAR related posts.

This is tremendous for a sport that has battled the “good ‘ole boys” perception for several years as they try to stay current and on-trend in terms of marketing and social media.

As someone who worked in racing for a period of time, I’m proud to see how the sport has been one of the first sports to relate to fans in this new way, and allow them to be as updated as possible with all of the happenings, as well as reach out to their favorite brands, drivers, journalists and other personalities in this new way.

It will be interesting to watch as more sports take from this concept and further social media within the industry.